Arka Photo Blog – Stu Mayhew

So I had spent an enjoyable, if occasionally wet, day in Canary Wharf it was time to get home and charge my batteries. My camera batteries naturally ! I made the short trip from where I live in Shooters Hill down to Artillery Square in Woolwich where Teatr Osmega Dnia would bring and end to GDIF 2014 with Arka.

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

This Polish theatre group began their performance amongst the large gathered crowd, winding their way up on to the main stage. It looked like a wedding celebration but was soon interrupted by a military invasion symbolised by fire eating men who being wheeled through the square on wood and metal contraptions spitting flames high into the night sky, drawing cheers and gasps from everyone.

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

Meanwhile the stage had turned into a scene of huge burning windows , silhouetting the crowd. This large flaming structures were then moved through the crowds and the scene was strange yet beautiful to behold.

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

The performance is about war and refugees being displaced from home. It was quite a moving piece and visually captivating. GDIF has really discovered Artillery Square as a great performance venue and bring the Arts right into the the center of Woolwich has to be applauded, there is always a really big, highly appreciative crowd and tonight was no exception

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

As a huge ship gently sailed into the crowd the show ended and the curtain was closed on GDIF 2014. It is a real privilege to be apart of it, in my own small way. Over the years I have met many of the performers and photographers and its nice to see old faces. A massive effort goes into to bringing such a prestigious event to Greenwich Borough and long may it continue.

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

If you live locally and enjoy photography or want to learn how to get more out of your camera then visit http://www.woolwichphotographic.com and find out more about Greenwich’s award winning camera club!

See you next year

Stu

Behind-the-Scenes with Light the Fuse Theatre Co.

Full Stop Blog
By Light the Fuse Theatre Co.

Travelling around on buses is part of being a Londoner. Whether it’s the night bus at 2am with half a box of chips and the music still ringing in your ears or a desperate dash to grab the bus to avoid being late for work at 8.48am – we all have bus stories to tell. And that was where we started at Light the Fuse in thinking about stories for Full Stop. We soon realised that the star of this show was the bus stop itself. It’s an incredible place for people watching, random encounters and strange occurrences. The huge diversity of people that frequent a bus stop in a twenty-four hour period is mind-boggling.

Did you know that there are 19,500 bus stops in London and 90% of Londoners live within 400 yards of one!

So we decided to make a show about that. In twenty minutes. No pressure.

With three performers and a lot of running about we jump from the midnight revellers to the warring Mums, laden down with shopping and gunslinger fantasies, ticking off each hour until midnight returns again. We meet the little old lady who visits the bus stop every day, not to get on the bus, but to appease her murderous whims. There are the teenage dinosaurs, all screeching and antagonistic, the ultra competitive office workers and the couple that could have been. 

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The bus stop is an incredible crucible for human emotion: the frustration of time, the pressure of city life and the possibility of romance all in one identifiable location. It is archetypal. This meant getting the look of the bus stop right was key, so we went to the experts. Theatre Royal Plymouth create sets for productions across the UK and the world. Recent shows have included Book of Mormon, Miss Saigon, The Full Monty and obviously Full Stop

Although petrol buses have been used in London since 1904 bus stops didn’t appear till after the First World War.

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We wanted the set to look as much like a real London bus stop as possible (with a few cleverly hidden extras). When the audience spots it by the Cutty Sark, in the middle of a town square, halfway up a field, we want them to double-take and for a moment question why there would be a bus stop out there. It’s such an iconic symbol that we take for granted every day, but move it from its natural location and suddenly it becomes a space full of potential.

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Full Stop is not just about the reality of waiting at a bus stop, its about the fantasies and dreams we all have while we wait. The moment of getting eye contact with a fit looking stranger, sheltering under it when there is a downpour, vying for the bench. All these moments spark a surreal journey based around a real London landmark.

Full Stop (web resize)