Eyes down for Bingo Lingo at GDIF

Hiya one and all in that there London,

Let us introduce ourselves.. I’m Beryl – 4ft 10 with blonde wavy hair, brown eyes wearing a leopard print suit

Beryl

and this is Cyril – he’s 5ft 4, dark brown hair, brown eyes wearing a dapper oil slick colour jacket and black trousers.

daryl

It’s been a bit of a year I can tell you. September 2016 saw us playing Bingo Lingo at the Liberty Festival in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park down in London and it appears that we have created a bit of a buzz with our Bingo. We have gone Grande (according to Cyril that means large on that there incontinence).

Our Bingo Lingo (we added the lingo bit ourselves) is our attempt to make Bingo an official Paralympic sport. We were sat in the Labour Club in Barnsley in 2012 watching the Paralympics and it was such a wonderful opening ceremony, all about being equal, inclusive and creative…

But then the games began and they started going on about being Super Human and we don’t like that. I’ve never felt super human even with a few G&T’s inside me. No, we don’t want people excluded. Everyone should be able to participate and feel amazing!

We had been running our regular Bingo nights at the Barnsley Labour club for many years. It’s how we met. And the nights do get a good turnout. So, put two and two together… we decided to play Bingo on a Paralympic scale for the Non-Super Humans.

As charisma and style are our middle names our mobility scooters got pimped up – Cyril’s has a large red cage for his balls and I have hooks for me prizes to dangle off.  We enlarged our bingo cards to help them who are visually impaired and we also got loud speakers to help the ones you have to shout at. In no time at all, Bingo Lingo was born! It’s a team game where you support each other and have to share a prize… now that’s what we call inclusion.

bingo lingo

We even pimped up our Bingo calls and they inspired by the lives of ordinary people who are all just a little bit different. Bingo Lingo is a game for everyone, where disability politics meets cheeky end of the pier humour.

Bingo Lingo, a reinvention of a great British tradition. So it’s eyes down for a game like you’ve never played before. … eh and Just remember when you’re stuck indoors and feeling quite low, get off your fat arse and come and play Bingo Lingo!

bingo 3

In 2017 we have already played Brighton Festival and Norfolk and Norwich Festival. Beautiful weekends away and made us realise that people in the South do actually have a sense of humour. It’s been great and we look forward to many more games of Bingo Lingo.

This is what people have been tweeting on that there Twitter thingy:

Bingo Lingo at the @NNFest Garden Party was absolutely hilarious, I laughed til I cried”

Awesome bingo calling @BingoCyril @LingoBeryl “Amputee: 83” “Theresa’s Den: number 10” “Guide Dog Poo: number 2”

I looooved this! A fun game for kids but also so many political and adult jokes thrown in. Highlight of my day”

Best Game of Bingo I have EVER played”

bingo lingo 2

Keep updated with all things Bingo Lingo, follow us on that there Twitter using @LingoBeryl and @BingoCyril or like on our FaceBooklet page @BingoLingoBingo


Come and play Bingo Lingo at Greenwich Fair on Saturday 24 and Sunday 25.
Find out more at festival.org

 

 

GDIF2015 Photo Ambassador Toby Hawkes at Greenwich Fair

GDIF2015 Photo Ambassador and winner of our GDIF2014 photo competition Toby Hawkes took on Greenwich Fair yesterday. We had a bit of rain, but soon enough the sun came out and the fair came to life once again.

Remember to submit your photos from the festival to this year’s photography competition hosted by Award.io. You just might win a Thames sightseeing cruise, a ThamesJet experience, or tickets to the ArcelorMittal Orbit and a giftcard to JOY!

Smoke by Plunge Boom. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Smoke by Plunge Boom. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Monotone Man by The Human Zoo. Photo by Toby Hawkes

Monotone Man by The Human Zoo. Photo by Toby Hawkes

Camping Delight by TinCanCompany. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Camping Delight by TinCanCompany. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Pendula Fantastica by Travelling Light Circus.

Pendula Fantastica by Travelling Light Circus. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Dynamite & Poetry by 15ft6. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Dynamite & Poetry by 15ft6. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Île O by Barolosolo. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Île O by Barolosolo. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

 

Born in Hamilton, New Zealand, Toby Hawkes discovered his passion for landscape photography in 2007. It was an opportunity to combine an interest in technology with his love for the great outdoors. After a few years of mastering his craft, he had his first successful exhibition in Turangi in 2010. Toby Hawkes now has work on permanent display in various locations around the central North Island. Toby Hawkes is currently overseas taking a break in Europe.

For the latest updates from Toby Hawkes see his facebook page here

tobyhawkes.co.nz

Award.io

Opening Weekend Programme Announced

GDIF is delighted to announce programme highlights for the opening weekend of this year’s Festival.

As part of the Royal Greenwich Festivals, kicking off on Friday 26 June at 20:03 precisely, La Compagnie Oposito will be making a welcome return with their latest processional production Kori Kori.

On Saturday 27 and Sunday 28 June, Greenwich Fair will be unpacking a massive two day programme of outdoor arts, with a particular focus on circus for 2015, whilst across the river in Tower Hamlets the London premiere of a new outdoor production, 451, will feature inventive storytelling, fire and special effects.

More details of our opening weekend programme appear below. We’ll be revealing further exciting plans for the rest of this year’s GDIF (26 June – 5 July) later this month, so save the dates in your diary now!

 

La Compagnie Oposito - Kori Kori

La Compagnie Oposito – Kori Kori

Kori Kori
Fri 26 June, 20:03
Greenwich, SE10
Presented by La Compagnie Oposito

This UK premiere leads audiences on a theatrical journey through Greenwich packed with colour, music and passion.
[Part of Royal Greenwich Festivals]

 

Gandini Juggling - 8 Songs

Gandini Juggling – 8 Songs

Greenwich Fair
27 June (12:00 – 21:00)
28 June (13:00 – 18:00)
Cutty Sark Gardens, Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich Park,
Greenwich, SE10

This weekend of European style outdoor street theatre and dance features artists from the UK, Belgium, France, Denmark and Spain.

15feet6 - Dynamite & Poetry

15feet6 – Dynamite & Poetry

Companies include: Southpaw Dance Company, Avanti Display, Artizani, Stefano di Renzo, Gandini Juggling,  Cathy Waller Company, StopGap Dance Company, Baroloso, Plunge Boom, TinCanCompany, Emergency Exit Arts, Travelling Light Circus, Toc de Fusta, The Human Zoo, 15feet6 and Collectif Malunés.

Collectif Mallunes - Trailler Sens Dessous Dessous

Collectif Mallunes – Trailler Sens Dessous Dessous

Offering the largest and most intensive programme of street arts in the capital, Greenwich Fair is an overload of unconventional theatrical experiences, from a musical performance on a stage filled with water, to juggling reinvented to 8 classic Rock & Roll tracks, a choreographed fairground Carousel and an explosive acrobatic experience.

[Part of Royal Greenwich Festivals]

 

Periplum and Corn Exchange Newbury - 451

Periplum and Corn Exchange Newbury – 451

451
Sat 27 June, 22:00
Bethnal Green Gardens, E2 9PA
Commissioned by GDIF and presented by Periplum and Corn Exchange Newbury

This spectacular, immersive show, inspired by Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, depicts a society where reading is forbidden and books are burned.

Q&A with Tiata Fahodzi Artistic Director Lucian Msamati and actors Ery Nzaramba and Anniwaa Buachie

Palessa Mokoena
Assistant Producer
Tiata Fahodzi

We’re so excited to be on tour this summer with our first outdoor performance The Legend of Hamba. I decided to ask some of the cast (Ery Nzaramba & Anniwaa Buachie) and our Artistic Director Lucian Msamati (also director of Hamba) a few questions about the process.

What really IS the main difference in performing outdoors vs indoors? Have a read below for some helpful hints and insight into the outdoor festival world, and some secrets to the Tiata Fahodzi creative process!

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.02.01 AM

 What’s been the key difference in preparing for outdoor performance and indoor performance?

Ery Nzaramba (Actor)
For me the challenge has been pushing my physicality past the norm; the over-the-top acting, and even the clown acting – telling a story without words, so precision is key. And because it’s an outdoor performance it has to be bigger than big. So it’s a physically taxing show.

Anniwaa Buachie (Actor)
Vocal energy! When performing outside you are not in a confined space and have to find ways to combat the city noises – Aeroplanes, police sirens, trains, traffic etc. So vocal energy is even more important. You need your voice to be rooted and free from tension to capture your audience’s attention.

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.02.19 AM

 What do you enjoy most about the process?

Ery:
The challenge and opportunity to learn and grow as a performer.

Anniwaa:
The not knowing. Being able just to play and experiment. Every day is different, I discover different things each time I have performed Hamba.

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.02.45 AM

What did you find the most challenging/ enjoy the least about the process?

Ery:
The sheer physicality of it – you have to learn to pace yourself and still give it your all.

Anniwaa:
Nothing!

Lucian Msamati (Artistic Director of Tiata Fahodzi and Director of The Legend of Hamba)
 The biggest blessing for me was also the biggest curse. There is a mixture of excitement and trepidation when creating a piece from scratch. You may spend a whole day working on a brilliant scene or moment only to discover when you put it all together that it is not serving the story or that it is not working!

Whether people love or hate it is out of your control; but you can control the quality and solidity of your story or approach. And that as I said is the most life-affirming, exciting, butt-clenchingly, terrifying thrill of the job.

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.03.06 AM

The Legend of Hamba is an abstract and physically demanding piece, what was the most demanding aspect of the preparation as an Actor / Director?

ERY:
Letting go of my inhibitions. Accepting to make the fool of myself or look unflattering in front of others during the devising and improvisations in rehearsals. Then the idea of performing outdoors in front of people who maybe don’t care…

Lucian:
As an actor in my own right, I know that when slip-ups happen, or when the team has an ‘off-day’ etc. there are ‘running repairs’ you can fall back on/ kick in to, to keep things ticking over. 9.85 times out of 10, unless there is a glaring problem or issue, the audiences don’t know any better. As a director however, I find it excruciating watching the team do their job. When it comes down to it, for me it is like teaching your child to ride a bike. You run alongside, you encourage, you instruct, you comfort them when they fall off, build up their confidence and then… you let them go off and compete in the Tour de France! Once the signal comes to start, it’s all, all in their hands ( or feet). All you can do is sit back and hope to goodness you’ve given them enough to be the best.

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.03.14 AM

Your first performance at Brighton was very well received, what difference does an audience make to an outdoors performance?

Ery:
The audience is the missing link, they make the show. In Brighton our main lesson was that what we’d devised “worked”. And all the fears I had about performing outdoors – the idea of performing in front of people who don’t care revolts me, and the idea of begging for their attention revolts me even more – vanished. If your show is interesting, you won’t have to beg for attention. So it’s all about the quality of the show, not its location.

Anniwaa:
When performing in a theatre, it is clear where the audience will be sitting. But with an outdoor performance, audiences can be sitting  anywhere! You could also be performing for audience members who happen to be peaking through their curtains!

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.03.43 AM

How did the unpredictable British weather affect your performance?

Ery:
Brighton was very windy…except in the Royal Pavilion Gardens where we performed, and very rainy…except the times we were performing.

Anniwaa:
I think the unpredictable British whether adds to the mystique of the piece.

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.03.55 AM

 Lastly: give me one word to describe Hamba?

Ery:
Big.

Anniwaa:
One word….mmmmm can I give to works instead? – COMPLEX

——

Check out The Legend of Hamba during Greenwich Fair and Global Streets!

Greenwich Fair, June 22
Global Streets, June 23-26

Sit Back, Hold Tight!

A blog written by Sarah Blanc, Artistic Director of Moxie Brawl, a fresh and currently all-female dance theatre company. ‘Sit Back’ evokes the spirit of the 1940’s through music, text and dance, this new dance theatre piece recalls the role of women at times of war.

photo by Bruno Rodrigues

I believe dance is for everyone so making and presenting work outdoors gives me a great opportunity to reach as wide and diverse an audience as possible.

Last year Moxie Brawl won the Gone In 20 Minutes 2013 Jury Prize following performances at over 5 festivals in the UK. Since then we have gained the support of Watermans, investment from Arts Council England and producing support from Candoco Dance Company (with whom I have been an Associate Artist for over 3 years).

Being part of GI20 was fantastic as we were able to learn how to adapt our work for the outdoors in a supportive way, gaining feedback along the tour. It was such an invaluable experience. I am excited that this year we have been able to develop the piece further with the help of all partners and festival presenters.

We used our 2 weeks of development time in the studio to go into more detail for certain sections of choreography and revisit costume, props and even the British Trollyebus Museum as part of our research.IMG_8473a

We worked with Mark Smith of Deaf Men Dancing to help make the piece more accessible for Deaf audiences and those with hearing impairments.

We have just returned from our first performances at Fetes Tour de la Blanche in Issoudoun, France and it is exciting to see audience reactions to our work and seeing it all come to life!

As a choreographer I have been so privileged to work with some gorgeous performers for Sit Back. First up is Lucy Starkey whose character Alice during the piece gets accepted to the Women’s Volunteer Service. Katie Cambridge, new to the moxie line up, plays Agatha whose fiancé is away at war and constantly dreams of his return. Josephine played by Kimberley Harvey is the most maternal of all the characters, constantly looking after everyone but during the piece she receives some devastating news. Winnie, played by Jenny Reeves, is younger more innocent and with her Dad being away in the war working as a doctor, she wants to follow his footsteps and study medicine.

It has been such a great few weeks and we are more than buzzing to get this show on the road. Looking forward to seeing you along the way at GDIF and hope for you to meet Alice, Agatha, Josephine and Winnie- four trolley bus clippies working in London of 1942.

Hold Tight Please!

—–

Show time:

Sat 21 June 14:05, 17:10
Sun 22 June 13:15, 15:00
Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich, SE10
FREE (Runs approx. 20 mins)

Click here to watch the highlights of Sit Back at Gone In 20 Minutes.

Explore love relationship with HURyCAN

Spanish company HURyCAN’s stunning duet Te Odiero represents the meeting point between love and exasperation, which boost love relationships and lead to sentimental ups and downs. A place where movements and desires clash with the clumsiness of the bodies they inhabit. Confrontation and union merge and the performers embark upon a dazzling dance that is both volatile and uniting.

We asked ourselves what does our fantasies look like when we live them out? We decided to experiment who we are, to search for the particularities, specific features that could bring us to actions and expressiveness.

How to build a concrete and physical language able to communicate with humor and emotion? We tried to draw our experience, as a living journey through love relation : different, similar, learned and invented. The unstable balance of an evolution process – a process of life.

te odiero 4

Burning our feet on a fiery blazing floor at midday, sinking under rain’s waterfalls at dusk, chock and caress, sometime nobody, sometimes not even a space left…  caching the attention of empty squares, bringing people almost from their homes, across their windows and balconies… or inventing a space to perform, between legs, shopping bags, pets and willchairs, when the thick crowd covers the hole stage.

Te Odiero is a place to coexist, a place where we cling to each other to survive, it is not always easy or pleasant, it is what it is : potential, limits, passion, exasperation, uncontrollable life.

SHOW TIME: 
Sat 21 June 15:50, 18:10
Sun 22 June 14:10, 17:25
Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich, SE10
FREE (Runs approx. 20 mins)

GDIF2014 Directie & Co. Site Visit

539042_10151106009941380_927651790_nBy Emily Thomas, Projects Administrator at GDIF

Sophie and I are busy pulling together the arrangements for GDIF2014 and recently organised a rain-soaked site visit with a Dutch company performing as part of Greenwich Fair. Yvonne van den Akker is one of the two directors of Directie & Co., whose show Laundry XL will visit GDIF this summer. This all-female performance weaves together elements of dance, theatre, visual art and, ironically, a bit of water. This is our first site visit with an artist for this year’s festival, and for me being new with GDIF, a great opportunity to walk the various festival spaces and start to imagine the physical reality of the festival amidst these months of planning.

Site Visit 20.1.14 004

I used to work on the Watch This Space Festival at the National Theatre, where Theatre Square in front of the building was our foremost site for the festival. Having such a choice of sites is still quite a novelty for me and we discussed with Yvonne a number of possible spaces for staging the performance, which has a processional element. The next stage will be to piece together the rest of the Greenwich Fair programme to see where all the elements best fit, so we can maximise each show’s potential. It’s a bit like a giant jigsaw puzzle.

Watch This Space 2011 courtesy of the National Theatre

Watch This Space 2011 courtesy of the National Theatre

Yvonne had a whistle stop tour in London, leaving and returning to Amsterdam in the same day. A brief but productive visit, and I hope that the company’s next visit in June will be sunnier for her.

Laundry XL by Directie & Co. (Photo by Cies de Vries Fotografie)

So while it is nice to now be back in the cosy, dry GDIF offices, for me this has been a very welcome introduction to GDIF2014. I feel that we’ve now properly met!

Greenwich Fair through the photographer’s lense – By Stu Mayhew

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This gallery contains 19 photos.

By Stu Mayhew Saturday, 22 June 2013   Today was the start of the Greenwich Fair , accompanied this year by the Island Fair. A chance to immerse yourself in the weird and wonderful world of performers from around the world. … Continue reading

Festival Opening Day – By Stu Mayhew (photographer)

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This gallery contains 5 photos.

By Stu Mayhew After yesterday’s whale and all the publicity it generated, today was the official start of the festival. I was advised to be by The Cutty Sark, Greenwich’s greatest landmark, at 5.45PM. While there were plenty of people around I couldn’t see any actual performers. … Continue reading

“Monkey and Crocodile” – Rehearsals with the babies

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This gallery contains 5 photos.

By Creative Director Poppy Burton Morgan, Metta Theatre  Monkey and Crocodile – Juggling apples and babies No less than 3 of the 4 creative team for Monkey and Crocodile are working mums so for all of us it’s a constant juggling act … Continue reading