Contemporary dance meets Army life in free outdoor performances in Woolwich

Before it starts its UK tour at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe next month, Rosie Kay Dance Company is coming to Woolwich to perform a unique 25-minute outdoor version of 5 Soldiers on Friday 7 and Saturday 8 July.

As part of the GDIF festival strand All Roads Lead to Woolwich, the company will perform in the bombed out St. George’s Garrison Church opposite Woolwich Barracks, giving the work a site-specific poignancy.

5 Soldiers dance team resting during operation Solway Eagle

5 Soldiers explores the role of the body in warfare and the experiences that soldiers have, both mental and physical. When asked why she’s looking forward to presenting this re-working of the piece at Greenwich+Docklands International Festival, choreographer Rosie Kay said:

It’s such a pleasure to be bringing our unique version of 5 Soldiers to GDIF this weekend. We’ve done outdoor shows in past with 5 Soldiers; in the street, shopping centres, outside Army bases, but once I heard what the location was going to be I had a serious re-think. Dancing a work about war, in a bomb destroyed church has real meaning and power, and I think that can be reflected in the show.

I wanted somehow to capture some of the mystery and atmosphere of the full length show, and I wanted to have some of the sound-score. Because of this, I decided to do a totally new re-work, with a similar structure to the full length show, in three parts, and a bit more of the journey; from training and drill, to messing out in PT, to the thrill and fear of being in an alien and hostile environment and the threat of injury. I think we’ve achieved that, and there are moments of fun and beauty, and great music with Annie Mahtani’s sound-score, The Clash and Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater. I can’t wait to see how it looks in the church, and to see what it does to the work; I think it could be quite moving and powerful.”

Woolwich has a particularly rich military history, being home to numerous military establishments with stunning architecture. The Royal Artillery Barracks, which housed the Royal Artillery for nearly 300 years, shows off the longest Neoclassical façade in London. The Royal Military Academy at the south end of Woolwich Common also has an impressive façade, this time in Mock Tudor style. Despite its current grandeur, the Royal Military Academy initially gained the modest nickname ‘The Shop’ because of its first location in a converted workshop. Historic England now cites it as ‘one of the most important pieces of military architecture in the country”.

The Garrison Church of St George was hit by a V-1 flying bomb during the Second World War and only its shell remains today. Amazingly, several mosaics survived the bombing, the largest being an image of Saint George and the Dragon which was part of a memorial dedicated to Royal Artillery members who’d been awarded the Victoria Cross.

church

To prepare for the upcoming performances, the five dancers recently worked alongside the Army on three days of combat exercises deep in the Scottish countryside. For this, they joined Exercise Solway Eagle, involving members of The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards who are soon to be deployed on an overseas peace-keeping mission.

Dancer Reece Causton, from Norfolk said

Talking to the troops and seeing them at work is incredibly valuable, it’s gold dust. As dancers we absorb it all, so the movements and the way they interact all comes out in our performance and gives a strong sense of realism.”

Here’s a clip of the dancers rehearsing in the studio today.

 

In previous years, 5 Soldiers attracted 5 star reviews from The Scotsman, The Herald and The Observer, as well as receiving a Special Commendation from the Royal Society of Public Health in recognition of its excellent contribution to arts and health practice.

Rosie Kay Dance Company has recently become one of Arts Council England’s newest National Portfolio Organisations, so come and see them in action this Friday and Saturday in Woolwich!

5 Soldiers will return to London in September with full hour-long performances taking place inside military venue Yeomanry House, presented in association with Sadler’s Wells.


St. George’s Garrison Church, Grand Depot Road, Woolwich, SE18
Friday 7 July, 1.45pm & 5.45pm
Saturday 8 July, 1pm & 5pm
Free & un-ticketed

Click here for details of how to get to St George’s Garrison Church

Click here to see what else is in store in Woolwich during the final weekend of Greenwich+Docklands International Festival

Miracles at GDIF

'The Colour of Time' by Artonik in association with East London Dance. Photo by Doug Southall

‘The Colour of Time’ by Artonik in association with East London Dance. Photo by Doug Southall

Described in The Guardian as an “annual miracle”, this year’s Greenwich+Docklands International Festival (26 June – 5 July) presented a series of stunning and unforgettable outdoor arts experiences attended by audiences of over 106,000.

Kori Kori by Compagnie Oposito. Photo by Warren King

Kori Kori by Compagnie Oposito. Photo by Warren King

 

From the UK premiere of Compagnie Oposito’s wonderful musical promenade through the grounds of the Old Royal Naval College to Periplum and Corn Exchange Newbury’s brilliant reinvention of Ray Bradbury’s dystopian novel in “451” in Bethnal Green Gardens, the Festival offered new perspectives and approaches to outdoor theatre.

451_Photo by Doug Southall_8

‘451’ by Periplum and Corn Exchange Newbury. Photo by Doug Southall

Our spectacular landmark production of “The Four Fridas” moved audiences to tears in Woolwich with its finale ritual flight of the Voladoras, whilst at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park “The Colour of Time” was a joyously immersive dance theatre experience with Indian gulal powder flying.

'The Four Fridas' - Photo by Doug Southall

‘The Four Fridas’ – Photo by Doug Southall

This year’s Greenwich Fair and Dancing City programmes provided further exceptional moments, whilst ingenious woodland storytelling in Look Left Look Right’s “Secret Princess of Severndroog Castle” delighted school groups, children and their families.

'Sens Dessus Dessous' by Collectif Mallunes. Photo by Warren King

‘Sens Dessus Dessous’ by Collectif Mallunes at Greenwich Fair. Photo by Warren King

Here are just a few of your comments from this year’s stunning Festival:

“We were children again for an afternoon, laughing at clowns, acrobatics, amazing by the imagination, the beauty and the talent of all artists.”

“Spectacular and unmissable.”

“Fantastic and free! A real treat in London.”

“Breathtaking, amazing, unforgettable!”

Join us again next year for GDIF2016: June 24 – July 3, 2016!

GDIF2015 Photo Ambassador Toby Hawkes at Greenwich Fair

GDIF2015 Photo Ambassador and winner of our GDIF2014 photo competition Toby Hawkes took on Greenwich Fair yesterday. We had a bit of rain, but soon enough the sun came out and the fair came to life once again.

Remember to submit your photos from the festival to this year’s photography competition hosted by Award.io. You just might win a Thames sightseeing cruise, a ThamesJet experience, or tickets to the ArcelorMittal Orbit and a giftcard to JOY!

Smoke by Plunge Boom. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Smoke by Plunge Boom. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Monotone Man by The Human Zoo. Photo by Toby Hawkes

Monotone Man by The Human Zoo. Photo by Toby Hawkes

Camping Delight by TinCanCompany. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Camping Delight by TinCanCompany. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Pendula Fantastica by Travelling Light Circus.

Pendula Fantastica by Travelling Light Circus. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Dynamite & Poetry by 15ft6. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Dynamite & Poetry by 15ft6. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Île O by Barolosolo. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

Île O by Barolosolo. Photo by Toby Hawkes.

 

Born in Hamilton, New Zealand, Toby Hawkes discovered his passion for landscape photography in 2007. It was an opportunity to combine an interest in technology with his love for the great outdoors. After a few years of mastering his craft, he had his first successful exhibition in Turangi in 2010. Toby Hawkes now has work on permanent display in various locations around the central North Island. Toby Hawkes is currently overseas taking a break in Europe.

For the latest updates from Toby Hawkes see his facebook page here

tobyhawkes.co.nz

Award.io

GDIF2014 Photo Competition Award Announcement!

This year GDIF held a Street Theatre photography competition, our second year running a photo competition with the amazing Award.io.

We saw a record 687 submissions, giving our judges Tony Othen of The Greenwich Gallery and GDIF’s marketing manager an amazing portfolio of work to choose from!

All of the below winning photos along with selected one’s will be exhibited on a digital screen atThe Greenwich Gallery in the coming weeks.

Toby Hawkes with his Muaré @ GDIF 2014 entry is the overall winner of this contest and will be GDIF 2015 Photo Ambassador. As Photo Ambassador, Toby’s photograph will be used for any photography competition materials in 2015 and he will be invited to GDIF2015 as an accredited photographer and photo blog contributor.

'Muaré@GDIF 2014' by Toby Hawkes‘Muaré @GDIF 2014’ by Toby Hawkes.

Judge’s comments:

Captures the heart and soul of GDIF including the color, the passion and the energy of the festival.

A riveting photograph the brings the work to life and engrains the performance in one’s memory.

�'Laundry'‘Laundry’ by Debbie Bevan.

2nd Place Judge’s comments:

Superb timing gives us a memorable moment in the act.

Enough of the props are shown to give us an idea of what is going on and the reaction from the audience(of all ages) shows that the performance is appreciated.

�'Opus‘Opus Music’ by Campbell Skinner.

3rd Place Judge’s comments:

An inventive and inspiring photograph that combines performer, audience and instrument into one lovely piece of art.

It tells the story of this show from multiple perspectives and there is always something new to discover every time you look at it.

�'Flood‘Flood 20’ by Przemyslaw Szyduk..

4th Place Judge’s comments:

Superb composition and timing.

The expression on the faces of the two performers shows how careful the timing has to be and the expressions on the faces of the audience shows engagement, apprehension and amusement.

�'Clown‘Clown Impression’ by Campbell Skinner.

5th Place Judge’s comments: A mesmerizing photograph which pulls at the heartstrings.

The color and facial expression invoke an amazing level of emotion and passion, and one is left wondering whether to find the photo heartwarming, sorrowful, nostalgic, or a little bit of all of the above.

Many thanks to everyone who contributed, Tony and The Greenwich Gallery and of course the ever-amazing Award.io team!

 

Arka Photo Blog – Stu Mayhew

So I had spent an enjoyable, if occasionally wet, day in Canary Wharf it was time to get home and charge my batteries. My camera batteries naturally ! I made the short trip from where I live in Shooters Hill down to Artillery Square in Woolwich where Teatr Osmega Dnia would bring and end to GDIF 2014 with Arka.

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

This Polish theatre group began their performance amongst the large gathered crowd, winding their way up on to the main stage. It looked like a wedding celebration but was soon interrupted by a military invasion symbolised by fire eating men who being wheeled through the square on wood and metal contraptions spitting flames high into the night sky, drawing cheers and gasps from everyone.

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

Meanwhile the stage had turned into a scene of huge burning windows , silhouetting the crowd. This large flaming structures were then moved through the crowds and the scene was strange yet beautiful to behold.

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

The performance is about war and refugees being displaced from home. It was quite a moving piece and visually captivating. GDIF has really discovered Artillery Square as a great performance venue and bring the Arts right into the the center of Woolwich has to be applauded, there is always a really big, highly appreciative crowd and tonight was no exception

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

As a huge ship gently sailed into the crowd the show ended and the curtain was closed on GDIF 2014. It is a real privilege to be apart of it, in my own small way. Over the years I have met many of the performers and photographers and its nice to see old faces. A massive effort goes into to bringing such a prestigious event to Greenwich Borough and long may it continue.

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

GDIF2014 Arka by Theatr Osmego Dnia ; Photo by Stu Mayhew

If you live locally and enjoy photography or want to learn how to get more out of your camera then visit http://www.woolwichphotographic.com and find out more about Greenwich’s award winning camera club!

See you next year

Stu

Stu Mayhew’s Photo Blog: Dancing City

Dancing City Blog from visiting photographer Stu Mayhew

Saturday the 28th June and it’s off to Canary Wharf to see the many acts that make up GDIF 2014’s Dancing City. This free event attracts performers from all around the world. With heavy showers falling I emerged from Canary Wharf tube station and was given a revised timetable of events , luckily provision was made for performances to take place indoors so I made the short walk across Jubilee Plaza and into the West Wintergarden. First up were Hands Down from Company Chameleon. I had seen them perform in GDIF 2012 and this new routine was equally as good. The two male dancers push and shove each-other in this ground breaking dance depicting how men interact. The physicality of the performance was incredible and the bar was set high for the rest of the day

'Hands Down' by Company Chameleon; Photo by Stu Mayhew

‘Hands Down’ by Company Chameleon; Photo by Stu Mayhew

Next up was The Awakening by StopGap Dance Co. Four disabled and non disabled dancers gave a mesmerising performance with a dream like quality , a lot of the moves are repetitive and really captivating.

'The Awakening' by StopGap Dance Company; Photo by Stu Mayhew

‘The Awakening’ by StopGap Dance Company; Photo by Stu Mayhew

Next a venue chance and it was off to Jubilee Place Mall. Surrounded by unsuspecting shoppers a stage was built right in the middle of the mall and as I arrived Laterite, choreographed by Thomas Micheal Voss, was thrilling the crowd with an intense routine of Tango accompanied by soprano supreme Eliana Pretorian. It was a beautiful performance.

Laterite by Thomas Michael Voss; Photo by Stu Mayhew

Laterite by Thomas Michael Voss; Photo by Stu Mayhew

Next on stage were Compania Sharon Fridman’s ¿Hasta Donde? which was very modern and again the skill and physical strength of the performers was jaw dropping. I confess to not seeing a lot of modern dance but what ever your views on it the dedication these performers must put in to perfecting these intense, intricate cannot be questioned. A bit hit with the crowd.

¿Hasta Donde? by Compañia Sharon Fridman; Photo by Stu Mayhew

¿Hasta Donde? by Compañia Sharon Fridman; Photo by Stu Mayhew

After many holidays to Spain I have a real soft spot for Flamenco and in for a treat when Marco Vargas and Chloe Brule performed Por Casualidad. In this fiery display of Flamenco the themes of unrequited love in brief moments and accidental meetings are explored. This one was a real foot tapper.

Por Casualidad by Marco Vargas and Chloe Brule

Por Casualidad by Marco Vargas and Chloe Brule

I ventured back outside and in between showers performers with Big Dance were strutting their stuff. The Big Dance features hundreds of talented young dancers and youth dance companies and the inclement weather certainly hadn’t dampened their enthusiasm.

Big Dance; Photo by Stu Mayhew

Big Dance; Photo by Stu Mayhew

Closing the curtain on the day’s events was Circ Panic The Man Who Lost His Buttons. Combining the silent comedy of Chaplin and the skills of a circus performer against the backdrop of the Thames and the City beyond this was a show stopper of an act. In a constant battle of wits against a contraption made up of a large pole and backed by a live band , this gravity deifying act drew gasps from those watching. A great way to end a fantastic day. Next up was Arka later that evening.

The Man Who Lost His Buttons by Circ Panic; Photo by Stu Mayhew

The Man Who Lost His Buttons by Circ Panic; Photo by Stu Mayhew

Inside Out

Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 9.15.38 AMLucian Msamati

Artistic Director, Tiata Fahodzi

For a mostly building based company like Tiata Fahodzi, the making of Hamba, our first outdoor show, has very much been the ultimate ‘back-to-basics’ challenge. The bricks, tricks and mortar of theatre buildings offer a degree of certainty: audience there, actors here, share a drink over there.

Outside on the street you are literally and figuratively at the mercy of the elements; yes, there are codes and understood rules of engagement but there
is no guarantee that they are espoused and respected in the same way by everyone else.

The fundamental need of the performer in this zone however is the same: to demand, engage and hold the attention of an audience. So how do I move someone to
tears as they run to catch the bus or chat or daydream? For us the answers began with questions from within: what makes you stop/ turn your head/ pay attention/ engage in the park/street/bus/motorway tailback etc.? When a car backfires or tyres screech, we react viscerally. There is something unguarded and honest in it.

In other words, the more honest and unapologetic the subject or object is the more likely we are to pay attention. The Proscenium Arch of a theatre justifies our  great and magical games of complicit make believe; doing so in your local park or high
street demands that you justify yourself! In other words the concept of certainty has to come from within.

This was our cue to buckle down and tell the story honestly, openly, enthusiastically and with integrity. Storytelling, make-believe and theatre existed long before the West End. Architecture, technology and lyricism never trump the truth: a good story, told with invention doesn’t need a huge budget to work. Now is our time to be honest and courageous and hope you are transfixed!

Catch The Legend of Hamba one more time tonight (Thursday, June 26) at 8:30 at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park as part of Global Streets

GDIF2014 starts today with Awardio photo contest!

GDIF2014 starts today – join us on in Cutty Sark Gardens for a giant circus wheel, street games, musical men on segways and our opening night spectacle Muare with aerialists, live music and mobile op-art in front of the Queen’s House next to The National Maritime Museum.

———-

In collaboration with Award.io we are running a photo contest for the second year in a row for this year’s Festival, which also starts today! So, if you came to GDIF2014 and take some great shots with your camera, mobile phone or tablet upload them onto the portal and get a chance to win an incredible series of prizes.

The theme this year is “Street Theatre”

1st Place: 

2nd place:

3rd Place:

Runner-Up:

All photos from winners will be displayed during a digital exhibition at The Greenwich Gallery on their plasma screen in Fall 2014. Details TBD.

The contest closes August 31, 2014. To submit your entry go to award.io/GDIF. Participation in the contest is free. GDIF will also pick a selection of submitted photos to feature in GDIF2014’s photo galleries.

Tony Othen from The Greenwich Gallery will join a representative from the GDIF team on the judging panel.

awardio-Logo-

 

After premiering to a crowd in excess of 5000 in Brighton, Safe House will be travelling to the Greenwich+Docklands International Festival on June 21st. The show is a large-scale, outdoor theatre event that explores our relation to the home – which is ironic considering just how little time the cast and crew have spent in our own homes recently!

With projection-mapped animations that feature during every one of the 45 minutes of the show’s duration, the ‘Draw’ side of Draw & Code were kept very busy indeed in the run-up to this fantastic outdoor theatre event. We were required on site during rehearsals to tailor our animation to the needs of the performers from Wired Aerial Theatre Company and the producers from Metro Boulot Dodo. While animation is always time-consuming, it doesn’t often result in you travelling the country!

safehousecloseup

The rehearsals were staged in Leicester, Metro Boulot Dodo’s home town, where the disused Haymarket Theatre was about the only building we could find that was capable of fitting the giant set. This oversized creation stands a lot taller than a real house, which makes for quite a challenge for the dancers who are suspended from it.

When I set off to take up residence in Leicester I decided to take the office iMac with me on the train. After all, what if the laptop isn’t enough? If you’ve seen a photo of somebody with an iMac on a train and gone “really?” – it was probably me!

safeactionaction

Rehearsals were draining, but a physically and logistically challenging production like this cannot leave any stone unturned. Thankfully it’s always fun working with the spectacular Wired Aerial performers. They are part athletes, part artists and we have enjoyed seeing them interact with our animations.

It hasn’t all been smooth sailing though; having upped sticks from our Liverpool sanctuary, for much of the time I was Draw & Code’s sole representative in the chilly theatre while they could all head back home to Liverpool. The rehearsals began during the tail-end of the winter – in a venue that had no heating. It’s fair to say that an abandoned theatre lacks a few creature comforts!

safehousepromo

The contrast between the first day of rehearsals in a dingy abandoned building and the public premiere of Safe House in sunny Brighton was amazing. As we sat in amongst the barbecues on the grass of Hove Park it was the first time in a long time that I could relax, although the cast and crew will have been tense.

The show went without a hitch and the crowd loved it. We hope you can leave your own little castles for a few hours, wherever you are, and join us to watch Safe House!

Screen Shot 2014-06-17 at 12.29.07 AM

Safe House will be performed at Greenwich+Docklands International Festival 2014 on Saturday June 21st at 10PM in Mile End Park, Tower Hamlets.

Q&A with Tiata Fahodzi Artistic Director Lucian Msamati and actors Ery Nzaramba and Anniwaa Buachie

Palessa Mokoena
Assistant Producer
Tiata Fahodzi

We’re so excited to be on tour this summer with our first outdoor performance The Legend of Hamba. I decided to ask some of the cast (Ery Nzaramba & Anniwaa Buachie) and our Artistic Director Lucian Msamati (also director of Hamba) a few questions about the process.

What really IS the main difference in performing outdoors vs indoors? Have a read below for some helpful hints and insight into the outdoor festival world, and some secrets to the Tiata Fahodzi creative process!

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.02.01 AM

 What’s been the key difference in preparing for outdoor performance and indoor performance?

Ery Nzaramba (Actor)
For me the challenge has been pushing my physicality past the norm; the over-the-top acting, and even the clown acting – telling a story without words, so precision is key. And because it’s an outdoor performance it has to be bigger than big. So it’s a physically taxing show.

Anniwaa Buachie (Actor)
Vocal energy! When performing outside you are not in a confined space and have to find ways to combat the city noises – Aeroplanes, police sirens, trains, traffic etc. So vocal energy is even more important. You need your voice to be rooted and free from tension to capture your audience’s attention.

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.02.19 AM

 What do you enjoy most about the process?

Ery:
The challenge and opportunity to learn and grow as a performer.

Anniwaa:
The not knowing. Being able just to play and experiment. Every day is different, I discover different things each time I have performed Hamba.

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.02.45 AM

What did you find the most challenging/ enjoy the least about the process?

Ery:
The sheer physicality of it – you have to learn to pace yourself and still give it your all.

Anniwaa:
Nothing!

Lucian Msamati (Artistic Director of Tiata Fahodzi and Director of The Legend of Hamba)
 The biggest blessing for me was also the biggest curse. There is a mixture of excitement and trepidation when creating a piece from scratch. You may spend a whole day working on a brilliant scene or moment only to discover when you put it all together that it is not serving the story or that it is not working!

Whether people love or hate it is out of your control; but you can control the quality and solidity of your story or approach. And that as I said is the most life-affirming, exciting, butt-clenchingly, terrifying thrill of the job.

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.03.06 AM

The Legend of Hamba is an abstract and physically demanding piece, what was the most demanding aspect of the preparation as an Actor / Director?

ERY:
Letting go of my inhibitions. Accepting to make the fool of myself or look unflattering in front of others during the devising and improvisations in rehearsals. Then the idea of performing outdoors in front of people who maybe don’t care…

Lucian:
As an actor in my own right, I know that when slip-ups happen, or when the team has an ‘off-day’ etc. there are ‘running repairs’ you can fall back on/ kick in to, to keep things ticking over. 9.85 times out of 10, unless there is a glaring problem or issue, the audiences don’t know any better. As a director however, I find it excruciating watching the team do their job. When it comes down to it, for me it is like teaching your child to ride a bike. You run alongside, you encourage, you instruct, you comfort them when they fall off, build up their confidence and then… you let them go off and compete in the Tour de France! Once the signal comes to start, it’s all, all in their hands ( or feet). All you can do is sit back and hope to goodness you’ve given them enough to be the best.

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.03.14 AM

Your first performance at Brighton was very well received, what difference does an audience make to an outdoors performance?

Ery:
The audience is the missing link, they make the show. In Brighton our main lesson was that what we’d devised “worked”. And all the fears I had about performing outdoors – the idea of performing in front of people who don’t care revolts me, and the idea of begging for their attention revolts me even more – vanished. If your show is interesting, you won’t have to beg for attention. So it’s all about the quality of the show, not its location.

Anniwaa:
When performing in a theatre, it is clear where the audience will be sitting. But with an outdoor performance, audiences can be sitting  anywhere! You could also be performing for audience members who happen to be peaking through their curtains!

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.03.43 AM

How did the unpredictable British weather affect your performance?

Ery:
Brighton was very windy…except in the Royal Pavilion Gardens where we performed, and very rainy…except the times we were performing.

Anniwaa:
I think the unpredictable British whether adds to the mystique of the piece.

Screen Shot 2014-06-14 at 12.03.55 AM

 Lastly: give me one word to describe Hamba?

Ery:
Big.

Anniwaa:
One word….mmmmm can I give to works instead? – COMPLEX

——

Check out The Legend of Hamba during Greenwich Fair and Global Streets!

Greenwich Fair, June 22
Global Streets, June 23-26